Africare News Release

 

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Julius E. Coles

Julius Coles participating in emergency food distribution in East Africa.

Africare President Receives
Princeton University’s Madison Medal

PRINCETON, NJ, February 24, 2007 – There are many words you could use to describe Julius E. Coles: Humanitarian. Internationalist. Family Man. Princeton University chose a handsome bronze medal to encrypt their description. It bears the words, “Dedicated Public Servant and Humanitarian, Distinguished Educator, Supportive Mentor, Inspiring Role Model."

On Saturday, February 24, Julius E. Coles, president of the oldest and largest African American led charity assisting Africa (Africare), became the 34th recipient (and second African American recipient) to be awarded Princeton University's Madison Medal — named in honor of the fourth president of the United States, James Madison, who also was the first Princeton graduate student. The medal is an annual award given by Princeton University to honor an alumnus or alumna who has achieved an outstanding record of public service, led a distinguished career, or advanced the cause of graduate education.

A 1966 graduate of Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Coles has been committed to the work of international development for more than 35 years. Before assuming the presidency of Africare in June 2002, Coles pursued a successful career with the U.S. Agency for International Development, where, for 28 years and in more than a dozen African and Asian countries, he helped develop and implement programs for improved health care, education and food security. Coles also served as director of the Center for International Affairs at Morehouse College, and Howard University’s Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center.

Dedicated to the the work of international development, Coles now focuses his time on increasing African aid and awarness of Africa, through Africare’s 150-plus programs in 25 countries Africa-wide. A majority of the projects focus on food security, health and HIV/AIDS; and all work in partnership with the community to achieve healthier, more productive societies.

Success, however, cannot be defined by money, statistics or even awards. For Coles, success is not in the accomplishment, but in the act: the act of dreaming, working and givinig in the name of public service… for a better Africa ... for a better world.

To learn more about Julius Coles and Princeton University's Madison Medal, click here.

 

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