President’s Messages

Africare’s President and CEO, Robert L. Mallett
Africare’s President and CEO, Robert L. Mallett

Monthly President’s Message – Social Media

The world is getting smaller. We are connected through the power of technology.  The internet. Smart phones. Computers, large and small.  Skype. FaceTime.  And on and on and on.   A few weeks ago Africare conducted staff training on how to use Twitter at headquarters and for 10 of our countries in Africa. The reviews suggest that it was a success.  (More on that later).

This training, as well as others we will undertake, is part of my key objective to create “One Africare”.  As many of you have heard me say before, our organization has its headquarters in Washington, D.C., but our mission is accomplished in districts and villages in the countries where Africare has a program presence. What weaves us together is that each of us, wherever we do our work, is committed to making African lives better.  That is the objective we share, and it is the driving force of our collective efforts.

To be “One Africare,” and to achieve our organizational objectives, we have to commit ourselves through a process of setting goals and financing them.  We do not just commit to donors.  We commit to each other.  We commit to our partners, with, and for whom, we undertake our work. I want to share with you what I believe these commitments are:

  • First, we commit to honesty and integrity.
  • Second, we commit to excellence.
  • Third, we commit to timeliness and responsiveness.
  • Fourth, we commit to innovation and entrepreneurship.

I am heartened by the stories coming from the people we work with in Africa.  Our programs continue to be designed to meet the needs of the communities we serve. Cookstoves in Nigeria, funded by McCann, maternity homes in Zambia funded by Merck, these are all examples of our projects and the depth and breadth of what we do on the Continent.

The mission of Africare is pretty spectacular. We enhance lives for the people of Africa. We see that conditions can change for the better. We work hard to make an impact. The people we touch will never know any of our names, and we may never know many of theirs.  But together we are making a difference. For now, that is enough.

Circling back to the beginning, I do hope you will follow us on Twitter. @Africare, our handle at headquarters, has been in existence a few short years and has already gained over 8,500 followers. We are currently following over 4,200 accounts and have Tweeted close to 6,600 times. You can also follow me at @AfricarePrezMallett.

I hope to “see” you soon.

Africare's former Honorary Chair, Nelson Mandela
Africare's former Honorary Chair, Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela: A Life Upright

Nelson Mandela possessed a monumental backbone.He wrote in his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, that he liked to think he inherited his father’s “straight and stately posture.” He was right. Mandela stood up perfectly straight – over six feet tall – and in every way nobly towered over his adversaries. He firmly demanded his own and others’ rights whenever they were withheld, never blinking in the face of intimidation. He was principled. He considered matters thoroughly, so he acted with poise and with full knowledge of the possible consequences, however grave.